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Kodak Ektachrome is Back

Over the past few weeks we have seen a number of announcements from leading brands in the world of photography, such as the new full-frame mirrorless cameras Canon EOS R, Nikon Z7 and Z6. But there was an even more important announcement that almost went unnoticed. At a time when several films are being discontinued, Kodak has announced that the Ektachrome color reversal film is back! The 135/36x camera format is already available and the Ektachrome 7294 for Super 8 movie films and 16mm format will arrive very soon.

 Image: Kodak

Image: Kodak

Color reversal film, or just slide film, marked an entire era and was very popular at the time. Nowadays many people like to write a caption next to their photographs saying "SOOC" (straight out of the camera) or "No crop", to respectively affirm that the photograph is a jpeg without any kind of processing and that they didn't cut any portion of the photo to reframe it. But much, much earlier, the slide film was the real "SOOC" / "No crop", because each photo was intended to be framed in a slide mount to be projected. And this was extremely important because it made it possible to display the photographs to an audience, whether in a company auditorium or the family room.

 Mamiya M645, Mamiya 645 80mm f/2.8, Fuji Velvia 50

Mamiya M645, Mamiya 645 80mm f/2.8, Fuji Velvia 50

To get an idea of the importance of the slide film, just think that one of the most iconic photographers ever, Steve McCurry, used the same type of slide film, the Kodak Kodachrome 64, almost throughout his career. This film is no longer available and I encourage everyone to watch this National Geographic documentary on "The Last Roll of Kodachrome".

For some years, from 2010 to 2012 I shot almost exclusively in film and although I photographed mainly black and white film to develop the rolls at home, I also shot some rolls of slide film. Curiously, I never used Ektachrome, but I'm still excited about this news. When I went to the lab to get my developed rolls and mounted on those small frames it was an excitement to be able to physically pick up the images, as opposed to downloading an SD card to the computer.

 Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.4, Kodak Elite Chrome 100

Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.4, Kodak Elite Chrome 100

 Yashica FX-D, Yashica ML 50mm F1.9, Kodak Elite Chrome 100

Yashica FX-D, Yashica ML 50mm F1.9, Kodak Elite Chrome 100

I used slide film mainly to photograph our family outings, so I'm sharing some of these moments here. The colors are not accurate because most of the rolls I used have expired quite a few years ago. The stores here in the region no longer have recent stock.

 Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.4, Kodak Elite Chrome 100 (expired 2002)

Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.4, Kodak Elite Chrome 100 (expired 2002)

 Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.4, Kodak Elite Chrome 100 (expired 2002)

Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.4, Kodak Elite Chrome 100 (expired 2002)

Hope you like the photos! For any question or doubt, please write in the comments or send me an email.

Thank you,
Hugo

 Bronica ETRSi, Zenzanon 75mm F2.8, Fuji Velvia 50 (expired 2007)

Bronica ETRSi, Zenzanon 75mm F2.8, Fuji Velvia 50 (expired 2007)

 Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.7, Fuji Sensia 100

Minolta X700, Minolta MD 50mm F1.7, Fuji Sensia 100

 Contax 167MT, Carl Zeiss 50mm F1.7 Planar, Fuji Reala 100

Contax 167MT, Carl Zeiss 50mm F1.7 Planar, Fuji Reala 100

 Bronica ETRSi, Zenzanon 75mm F2.8, Fuji Velvia 50 (expired 2007)

Bronica ETRSi, Zenzanon 75mm F2.8, Fuji Velvia 50 (expired 2007)

 Nikon F100, Nikkor 28-85mm F3.5~4.5, Kodak Elite Chrome 100

Nikon F100, Nikkor 28-85mm F3.5~4.5, Kodak Elite Chrome 100